The Biblearc Blog

Encouragements and Updates from Biblearc

Monthly Archives: November 2014

50% off Biblearc Gift Certificates

You use Biblearc to discover treasures in God’s Word. You arc, bracket and diagram. You search and read versions side by side. Perhaps you’ve taken one of our online courses like Introduction to Arcing. You have seen more of God via Biblearc. Who do you know who might likewise be enriched?

Biblearc Gift Certificates (now available)

You love Biblearc because you love God’s Word. Spread the love.

Gift certificates are available in the amount of $10, $25 or $50 and give you helpful gift options. Enter a gift note, the recipient’s email and a date (say, Dec 25th), and we will take care of making the delivery.

The big Biblearc gift deal

For one week only, $50 gift certificates are only $25. Likewise, $25 gift certificates are only $15. With enrollment for two new January courses opening December 8th, now is a great time to give a Biblearc Gift Certificate.

Biblearc Gift Certificates

Time is Short. Eternity is Near. (Part 3)

How do I walk the line between the blessings and responsibilities of this life, and the expectation of eternity? Guest blogger Robert Elphick shares his arc and notes on 1 Corinthians 7:35. (This is part 3 of 3.)

This is a well ordered life: that which has God as it’s center, so that all other things fall into place.

Having given this instruction (1 Cor 7:26-34), Paul assures the Corinthians that his words are for their good, to lead them towards properly ordered lives (v35d).

Some may have interpreted Paul’s words (e.g. encouraging singleness) as an unwelcome restraint. He assures them this is not his intent. No, he is helping them, assisting them, giving them information for their advantage in life! (A genuine life-coach, with advice not to be ignored!) He is trying to help them understand how to properly order their lives. Rather than restricting them from certain activities, Paul is guiding them, that in whatever they do, they should not be distracted from the coming eternity (v29-31). He wants them to be ready (unlike the many who will not be, Mt 24:38-39). He wants them to live free from earthly worries (v32-34), with undivided devotion to the Lord (35e, cf. Col 3:23).

Brothers, listen, the world and all of it’s trinkets are passing away!

Paul has seen (or soon will see) co-workers de-railed by a love for the world (2 Tim 4:10) and money (1 Tim 6:10). Brothers, listen, the world and all of it’s trinkets are passing away (v31)! Paul also seems to understand the intense stress that marriage can bring (v28). Maybe his advice for the married – to take their eyes off each another (v29) and fix them on the Lord (v35) – is intended to address some observed pitfalls. With a foundation of devotion to the Lord in place (and consistently renewed), they can then seek to please one another (v33,34).

So the exhortation is clear: with eternity drawing near, and the world as we know it passing, Paul would have us devoted to the Lord without distraction. This is a well ordered life.

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Go back to part 2 of Time is Short. Eternity is Near.

Go back to part 1 of Time is Short. Eternity is Near.

Three New Translations, in French and Spanish

We are pleased to announce the integration of two translations of the Bible in French, the Nouvelle Bible Segond, edition d’étude (NBS) and La Bible Annotée (LBA). In addition, we have added an additional Spanish translation, Nueva Biblia Latinoamericana de Hoy (NBLH). Check them out on Biblearc.

Biblearc is now in French! Read more in English or French.

NBS

Nouvelle Bible Segond, edition d’étude (NBS)

LBA

La Bible Annotée (LBA)

NBLH

Nueva Biblia Latinoamericana de Hoy (NBLH)

We thank God for the publishers who have made these translations available.

Société biblique française for the NBS
Claude Royère for providing the files for the LBA
The Lockman Foundation for the NBLH

Introducing Biblearc in French!

Arc, bracket, search, read, look up—do it all…in French!

Thanks to the great effort of our French-speaking volunteers, the website has been completely translated into the French language, with two wonderful French translations of the Bible. Please help us get the word out. You can point your French-speaking friends to this post in French.

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For more information on our efforts to translate Biblearc into many languages in order to serve those in cultures/places where study resources are scarce, please see our post on Biblearc Global. We welcome your support!

Qu’est-ce que Biblearc ?

This is the “What is Biblearc?” blog post for French speakers. For information in English, see here.

Biblearc est un ministère du Bethlehem College and Seminary depuis 2009. Il a été conçu pour assister celui qui étudie la Bible en débutant par une observation stricte et minutieuse du texte sacré avant d’ouvrir un commentaire. Ce peut être un prédicateur féru d’exégèse, un étudiant de la Bible ou tout simplement celui qui a faim de la Parole.

Biblearc in French

Biblearc est un programme implémenté dans le cloud et permet une étude approfondie des Écritures. Vous profiterez d’une intégration conviviale et puissante de références parallèles, de notes d’étude et de la recherche la plus avancée en langues originales disponible en ligne, ainsi que deux versions françaises de la Bible : la Bible annotée et la Nouvelle Bible Second, très appréciée pour ses notes de traduction. Biblearc est spécialisé dans des méthodes visuelles d’étude de la Bible : vous vivrez l’expérience la plus extraordinaire d’arcing, de bracketing et de diagramming de phrases. Tout votre travail est automatiquement enregistré en ligne dans des projets que vous pouvez retravailler plus tard.

Faites un tour interactif de Biblearc pour en savoir plus sur les possibilités.

Application disponible pour l’iPad dans l’App Store

Look at the Book Group

We at Biblearc have recently received several requests to create a group for those wanting to arc John Piper’s weekly Look at the Book passages. We think it’s a great idea!

If you are interested in participating in such a group, here is what you need to do!

  1. Let us know via the Biblearc feedback page.
  2. Indicate on the feedback form that you are interested in the Look at the Book Group.
  3. Make sure to indicate your email if you are not signed-in.
  4. That’s all! Based on the response we will put together a group and keep you updated!

(Note that we will not be providing a facilitator for this group. We are just making a way for interested people to get together and then let you run with it from there.)

If you are not familiar with Biblearc Groups or don’t know what Look at the Book is, read on…

Biblearc Groups are a way to virtually study the Word together on Biblearc. Groups can be formed around studying a topic, reading through a book of the Bible, a class or Bible Study that meets in real time, or, as in this case, around a series of passages being studied, called…

Look at the Book. Have you ever listened to a great sermon and asked yourself how the pastor studied in order to come to the conclusions he came to? Look at the Book is a peek into the process, as John Piper walks through various passages of Scripture, explaining the hows and whys of his study of scripture.

 

Time is Short. Eternity is Near. (Part 2)

How do I walk the line between the blessings and responsibilities of this life, and the expectation of eternity? Guest blogger Robert Elphick shares his arc and notes on 1 Corinthians 7:32-34. (This is part 2 of 3.)

There is much in life that tempts you to be anxious. But God calls us not to be anxious, and only in Him is that possible.

Previously (v26-31), Paul encouraged a life undistracted by the joys and pains of the world, because time is short and the current world system is passing away. Now, he says, live this out free from anxiety. What an encouraging invitation! Would anyone not want to be free from anxieties?

Would anyone not want to be free from anxieties?

He holds up for comparison the unmarried man and woman, who are concerned for the Lord’s affairs, and the married man and woman, who are concerned for pleasing their spouse. The married man, wanting to please his spouse, has divided interests. The single person is concerned for one thing.

Freedom from anxieties, it seems, does not mean we drift along without any concerns. The comparison indicates that true freedom means we are concerned for the Lord’s interests primarily. Anxiety for the Lord’s affairs, for pleasing the Lord, brings freedom (Matt 11:28-30), and this is how Paul would have us live.

Anxiety for the Lord’s affairs, for pleasing the Lord, brings freedom, and this is how Paul would have us live.

Is Paul saying that a married person can’t have such devotion to the Lord?  I don’t think so; v35 indicates that Paul wants a life of undivided devotion to the Lord for everyone. Paul acknowledges the married person’s responsibilities (v33b, v34e) to their spouse, and argues that when properly fulfilled, those responsibilities are not incompatible with a life devoted to the Lord. Freedom comes in part, it seems, by keeping the marriage in proper perspective, by understanding that it is temporary and secondary (v31, Lk 14:26).

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Go back to part 1 of Time is Short. Eternity is Near.

Biblical Exegesis by John Piper

Why is the serious and careful study of Scripture important? Why ought we to expound so much effort instead of simply reading? And if we do the serious and careful study, why isn’t that enough? Consider the following life-shaping quotes from John Piper.

An evangelical believes that God humbled himself not only in the incarnation of the Son, but also in the inspiration of the Scriptures. The manger and the cross were not sensational. Neither are grammar and syntax. But that is how God chose to reveal himself. A poor Jewish peasant and a prepositional phrase have this in common, they are both human and both ordinary. That the poor peasant was God and the prepositional phrase is the Word of God does not change this fact. Therefore, if God humbled JohnPiperfilephotohimself to take on human flesh and to speak human language, woe to us if we arrogantly presume to ignore the humanity of Christ and the grammar of Scripture.

The Scriptures aim to affect our hearts and change the way we feel about God and his will. The exegete, who believes that this aim is the aim of the living God for our day, cannot be content with merely uncovering what the Scriptures originally meant… It is the will of God that his Word crush feelings of arrogance and self-reliance and that it give hope to the poor in spirit.

Learn about the practice of biblical exegesis using arcing as John Piper’s Bible study method of choice in his classic booklet Biblical Exegesis: Discovering the Meaning of Scriptural Texts.

Time is Short. Eternity is Near. (Part 1)

How do I walk the line between the blessings and responsibilities of this life, and the expectation of eternity? Guest blogger Robert Elphick shares his arc and notes on 1 Corinthians 7:26-31. (This is part 1 of 3.)

Our time in this age is nearing an end, and the concerns of the age will pass away.

We see this truth specifically emphasized in verses 29b and 31c of 1 Corinthians 7. We know from the book of Matthew that many people will not be ready (24:38-39). These realities should deeply moderate our emotions and approach to all areas of life.

In the context of the below arced passage, Paul gives extended attention to the topic of marriage. It is good, morally and practically, for people to stay as they are. The married should not seek release, and the single should not seek a spouse. If the single marry they have not sinned, but they should know that marriage will bring ‘trouble’. The word used for ‘trouble’ is elsewhere translated ‘tribulation’ and ‘affliction’–this sounds like real pain. Paul knows this, despite not being married himself, and would spare the unmarried from it. Marriage should not be the focus of our lives (v 29d-e), and those with wives should live “as though they had none”.

Seek to approach all of your affairs in such a way that their joy and pain do not distract your heart or mind from impending Eternity.

You have a certain amount of time remaining in this life. Seek to approach all of your affairs in such a way that their joy and pain do not distract your heart or mind from impending Eternity. Know that the affairs of this age will soon pass away. Whether your marriage is hard or easy, or your work stressful or light, do not let them cause you to forget that your time is short, and eternity is near.

1 Corinthians 7: 26-31

 
Go to part 2 of Time is Short. Eternity is near.