The Biblearc Blog

Encouragements and Updates from Biblearc

2017 Bethlehem Conference for Pastors + Church Leaders

Registration is now live for the 2017 Bethlehem Conference for Pastors + Church Leaders. We always joyfully anticipate this yearly conference and as always Biblearc will have a booth. Tickets for the conference are now on sale for the first 95 hours of registration at $95 (for the 95 theses).

BCS_PasCon17_Web_TGC-banner_MPLS

Theme

Gospel Ambition: Advancing the Gospel Deep + Wide

Dates

January 30 – February 1, 2017

Location

Minneapolis Convention Center

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Phrasing Cheat Sheets (Printable PDFs)

We have prepared these cheat sheets that will help you memorize the passes of Phrasing, the types of phrases, the relationships and a non-exhaustive list of conjunctions and prepositions with their respective relationships and examples.

The 5 Passes

The 5 Passes

Type of Phrases

Type of Phrases

The Phrasing Relationships

The Phrasing Relationships

Conjunctions and Prepositions

Conjunctions and Prepositions

Genitive Relationships

Genitive Relationships

Online Course: Phrasing—Tracing the Arguments of Scripture

April 19th – June 7th

Students will learn all of the facets of phrasing and draw theological insights from Titus. Phrasing is an excellent tool for determining a biblical author’s main points and how he supports them. The course is designed for everyone from pastors to interested lay-people.

Tuition

Basic enrollment  $59 ($49 with early enrollment)
Discussion enrollment  $99 ($89 with early enrollment)  recommended
One-on-one enrollment  $149 ($139 with early enrollment)

Enrollees to this course will receive 2 free months of The Biblearc Subscription.

Interactive lectures This course includes seven interactive, one-hour lectures, in addition to an introductory lecture the first week. One-on-one and Discussion enrollment students will be invited to participate in the lectures via online video chat. Live lecture recording times will be scheduled in coordination with these students the first week of the course. Others may watch these lectures at their convenience after they are recorded.

Length This is a 8-week course.

Prerequisites None.

Discussion enrollment In addition to lectures and feedback, discussion enrollment gives you a one-hour group discussion time each week with an instructor of the course. Groups are made up of 5-9 students. Discussion groups will also be invited to participate in the lectures (see above).

Group time options Mon @ 6pm | Thurs @ 7am | Wed @ 8pm
All times are in CDT. Click to view them in your local time. If you have an entire group and want to request a different discussion time for you group, let us know.

One-on-one enrollment One-on-one enrollment allows you to benefit from a half hour of one-on-one time with an instructor each week, in addition to the standard provisions of the course.

Assignments This course includes seven extensive, biblically-rooted assignments which will be promptly corrected by an instructor and returned each week. The course assignments will cover the entire book of Titus.

PinedaAndy HubertInstructors Andy Hubert is the creator of Biblearc and has served as an instructor of Bible study methods and biblical languages. Andy holds a Masters of Pastoral and Biblical Studies from Bethlehem College and Seminary. Assisting will be Josué Pineda, who has worked as a pastor and church planter in Honduras, was the Director for Honduras of Precept International Ministries, and has spearheaded Biblearc’s Arcing courses in Spanish.

Work load Between the lectures (1 hr/wk) and assignments (~4 hrs/wk), participants should expect to spend approximately 5 hours per week on this course.

Grading This course uses a 100 point grading system for all assignments. Students who complete this course with a display of proficiency will receive an indication of this on their Biblearc account. This will allow people searching shared work the ability to find the projects of those users who have had training from Biblearc.com. (still in development)

From former students

“This course has allowed me to see the flow of Scripture like I never have before.”

“The Phrasing class is phenomenal!! Laying out the author’s main arguments and then tracing the subordinating thoughts that follow is absolutely invaluable for proper exegesis. I highly recommend Phrasing as a first step for those interested in deeper Bible study. I can’t stress enough the importance of being able to visually see how the text is all flowing together. 5 stars and two thumbs up, easily.

100% of former students surveyed recommend this course to others!

Additional information: What is Phrasing | Request a Scholarship | Give a Scholarship | Refund Policy

New iPhone and Android apps!

All of Biblearc…now in the palm of your hand.

Download on the App Store
Android app on Google Play

Introducing Published Pages

Social media for lovers of the Bible.

For those who find their delight in meditating upon the Word of God and not just airing their own opinions, this is the place for you.

Social media for lovers of the Biblearc.

Text nuggets and audio snippets backed up by in-depth study.

Create a tweet-sized nugget and 20 seconds of audio, drawing others into the full breadth of your study.

Text nuggets and audio snippets backed up by in-depth study.

Share with individuals, groups or the world.

Join us in creating a worldwide community of serious students of the scriptures.

Share with individuals, groups or the world.

Publish your work in minutes.

Understanding the depths of the Bible is not easy, but showing others what you have discovered should be. With Published Pages, it is.

Publish your work in minutes.

Online Course: Introduction to Arcing

Feb 17th – Mar 16th

This online, interactive course lays out the foundational concepts and structures necessary to begin using the Arcing Bible study method. It features personal and extensive feedback on eight different assignments. We will take a hands-on approach to learning as we work through the first chapter of James together.

Tuition

Basic enrollment  $59 ($49 with early enrollment)
Discussion enrollment  $99 ($89 with early enrollment)  recommended
One-on-one enrollment  $149 ($139 with early enrollment)

From Flickr, by Ken & Nyetta

Enrollees to this course will receive 2 free months of The Biblearc Subscription.

Format  There will be nine 30 minute lectures, released twice per week. Each lecture will be followed by an assignment due three days later. Assignments turned in on time will be corrected and returned before the release of the next lecture. Assignments turned in late, but prior to the end of the course, will be corrected and returned within three days. Lectures will be indefinitely available to participants.

Course length  This is a 5-week course.

Prerequisites  None

Discussion enrollment  In addition to lectures and feedback, discussion enrollment gives you a one-hour group discussion time each week with the instructor of the course. Groups are made up of 5-9 students. Rated 4.6 / 5 stars in significance by former discussion enrollees.

Group time options Mon @ 7pm | Thur @ 7am | Thur @ 7pm
(All times in CDT.)

One-on-one enrollment  One-on-one enrollment allows you to enjoy a half hour of one-on-one time with the instructor each week, in addition to the standard provisions of the course. Rated 4.7 / 5 stars in significance by former one-on-one enrollees.

hubertInstructors  Andy Hubert is the creator of Biblearc. Andy holds a Masters of Pastoral and Biblical Studies from Bethlehem College and Seminary. Assisting will be Josué Pineda, who has worked as a pastor and church planter in Honduras, was the Director for Honduras of Precept International Ministries, and has spearheaded Biblearc’s Arcing courses in Spanish.

Work load  Between the lectures (1 hr/wk) and assignments (~5 hrs/wk), participants should expect to spend approximately 6 hours per week on this course.

Grading This course uses a 100 point grading system for all assignments. Students who complete this course with a display of proficiency in Arcing will receive an indication of this on their Biblearc account. This will allow people searching shared work the ability to find the arcs and brackets of those users who have had training in these methods. (still in development)

From former students

“This is a great platform to take your bible study to the next level! The course is designed in such a way that the beginner and the experienced have a lot to take away… How awesome is the Word. It deserves to be studied deeper and this course teaches you how to do just that!”   Arpan Patro

“An amazing and exciting course which opened the door for me to go deeper in my study of God’s Word, and its application for my life!”   Heath Schroeder

99% of former students surveyed recommend this course to others!

Additional information: What is Arcing | Request a Scholarship | Give a Scholarship | Refund Policy

Online Course: The Theology of Biblical Poetry

Feb 17th – Mar 23rd

This course guides you through the study of Biblical Poetry. We will consider the figurative elements and forms of speech, along with the flow and structure of the text, to unlock treasures in God’s word—one proposition at a time. The most quoted psalms have been chosen for the focus of this course and will be examined via interactive lectures, organized group discussions and thoughtful feedback on assignments.

Tuition

Standard enrollment $149 ($139 with early enrollment)
One-on-one enrollment $249 ($239 with early enrollment)

Interactive lectures This course includes five interactive, 1.5-hour lectures, in addition to an introductory lecture the first week. You may watch these lectures live, or at your convenience. A different discussion group will be invited to participate in the lectures each week via online video chat. Live lecture recording times will be scheduled in coordination with the groups the first week of the course and then announced to all students.

Discussion groups An integral part of this course will be the 3-5 person discussion groups. Each student will choose a discussion group time from the options below and then meet with their group each week via video chat. Students will use this time to work through the primary assignment for the week, as well as to sharpen and challenge one another as they wrestle through the text. Both standard and one-on-one enrollment include the discussion group.

Group time options Sun 8pm | Mon 8am | Thurs Noon | Thurs 7pm
(All times in CDT. Click to view them in your local time.)

Assignments This course includes six primary assignments which will be promptly corrected by the instructor and returned each week. In addition, students are invited to complete six optional assignments. The optional assignments will not be corrected, but will be covered in each week’s lecture.

Course length This is a 6-week course.

Prerequisites Completion of Introduction to Arcing, Introduction to Bracketing or Arcing 101.

One-on-one enrollment One-on-one enrollment allows you to benefit from a half hour of one-on-one time with the instructor each week, in addition to the standard provisions of the course.

hubertInstructors  Andy Hubert is the creator of Biblearc. Andy holds a Masters of Pastoral and Biblical Studies from Bethlehem College and Seminary. Assisting will be Josué Pineda, who has worked as a pastor and church planter in Honduras, was the Director for Honduras of Precept International Ministries, and has spearheaded Biblearc’s Arcing courses in Spanish.

Work load Between the lectures (1.5 hrs/wk), group time (1-2 hr/wk) and assignments (4-5 hrs/wk), participants should expect to spend approximately 8 hours per week on this course.

Grading This course uses a 100 point grading system for all assignments. Students who complete this course with a display of proficiency in Arcing will receive an indication of this on their Biblearc account. This will allow people searching shared work the ability to find the arcs and brackets of those users who have had training in these methods. (still in development)

Google Hangouts This course uses Google’s “Hangouts on Air” to facilitate the live lectures, and ordinary Google Hangouts to facilitate discussion groups. All participants will be required to register for a free Google+ account if they do not already have one. (We will provide you information on how to do so.)

Additional information: Request a Scholarship | Give a Scholarship | Refund Policy

Graves of Craving (Numbers 11:31-35)

Is complaining really that grave of a sin?

Chapter 11 of Numbers begins with complaining. The Israelites in the wilderness complain (we aren’t told about what) and God burns the outsides of the camp. The people cry out to Moses, who prays to God and the fire stops. Immediately after this episode, the mixed multitude that came out of Egypt with the Hebrews start to complain– about food –and the people of Israel take up the cry. In verse 10 it says that “Moses heard the people weeping throughout their families, everyone at the door of his tent…”, which seems to indicate that a large portion of the Israelites had joined into the craving and complaining.

The people “despise” God by implying that He is not good, that rather Egypt was good.

Moses then joins in the complaining! Well, not exactly– he begins complaining, not about missing meat, but rather like a parent who’s “had it up to here” and is ready to quit, he complains to God: “Why have You put me in charge of this people!? I can’t deal with them! Just kill me now!” There is no doubt however, at least in my mind, that Moses’ complaint was different in kind than the sinful complaining of the people. The people grumble against God, whereas Moses talks directly to God. The people “despise” God by implying that He is not good, that rather Egypt was good (which requires some serious forgetfulness of the slave labor, starvation and murder of their children, not to mention forgetting how God saved them). Moses complains against the people, and recognizes that he is not capable of dealing with them. Does he perhaps sin, or come very close to sinning, by challenging God’s decision to put him in charge of the people? Maybe, but he also seems to put the failure at his own feet, and asks God to take him. God’s response is telling. He gives other leaders to help Moses rule the people, and He declares that He will punish the complaining cravers, in a very fitting way, by giving them exactly what they want:

[18]…And say to the people, ‘Sanctify yourselves for tomorrow, and you will eat meat, for you have wept in the hearing of the Lord, saying, “Who will give us meat to eat, for life was good for us in Egypt?” Therefore the Lord will give you meat, and you will eat. [19] You will eat, not just one day, nor two days, nor five days, nor ten days, nor twenty days, [20] but a whole month, until it comes out your nostrils and makes you sick, because you have despised the Lord who is among you and have wept before him, saying, “Why did we ever come out of Egypt?”’”…[24] So Moses went out and told the people the words of the Lord. …

Now we arrive at our arced passage. God brings quail, blows them in from the ocean and they land all around the camp. The people go out to gather and there is a huge amount. They lay them out, lick their chops, take a big bite, “But while the meat was still between their teeth, before they chewed it, the anger of the Lord burned against the people, and the Lord struck the people with a very great plague.” (vs 33)

Wait…what? I thought that having to eat meat until it “comes out of your nostrils and makes you sick” was the punishment for the craving and complaining. And it seemed a very fitting punishment. What happened? Take a look at verse 24: “So Moses went out and told the people the words of the Lord…” Moses told them what God had said. Moses told them that they were sinning in their craving and complaining. Moses told them there was a punishment coming and what that punishment was. The proper response of the people to being rebuked, to being confronted with their shocking ungratefulness and despising of the God of the Universe, should have been shame, remorse and repentance. But there is no response that we are privy to. They seem to miss the point completely, hearing only that meat is coming. They add sin to sin. Instead of turning from their sin and repenting they continue on the same path of craving, and so beg an even fiercer punishment than the first; a final punishment on those who craved, that serves as yet another warning to everyone else.

The proper response of the people to being confronted with their shocking ungratefulness and despising of the God of the Universe, should have been shame, remorse and repentance.

They call the name of the place “קִבְרוֹת הַתַּאֲוָה” Graves of Craving, because there they buried the people who craved. They didn’t put their sins of craving and complaining to death, but followed them down to the graves and were buried with them. “For the wages of sin is death…” (Romans 6:23a). Like all of Israel’s wilderness wandering, this episode serves as a serious warning to us. What cravings tempt you? When you are tempted, do you turn your eyes away from God and allow your cravings to supplant Him in your heart? When you cannot get what you crave, do you start to complain? “For the wages of [your] sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 6:23). So take the warning seriously, but do not despair! Your sins have been buried with Jesus, and He gives you the strength to bury your cravings and complaints.

Chronological Read

The Chess Master (Psalms 2)

The following Devotional study was submitted as a student project by Eric Kim, for The Theology of Biblical Poetry: Advanced Arcing/Bracketing online course. To find out more about online courses and to see what courses are currently available, click here.

 

Let’s say that I am playing chess with a Grand Master (and that I am an amateur). I am getting ready to attack one of the Grand Master’s good pieces. He then makes a move—that doesn’t protect it! I know that he sees my intention to attack that piece, so it is hard to understand his move… until the game is played out to the end.

Here is a picture of God being the Grand Master…

Here in Psalm 2 is a picture of God being the Grand Master, and humanity making a rebellious move against God by wanting to be their own gods. Nations and armies rise against Him and God’s response is that He appoints His Son as King over all (Psalms 2:6). How calmly and wisely and lovingly He responds to this situation that would make me cringe! Moreover He appoints the Son’s authority to be supreme over the entire world. No one will fully understand this “move” until the end of time. This majestic display of God’s power leads me to ask if I have been testing God in wanting to choose sin over Him. Will I make the Son mad who can break the entire world like a fragile glass? Therefore be filled with awe and change your allegiance away from the world, and from autonomy, to the Son.

Arc (1)

Nothing New, Nothing More Glorious. (Romans 1:1-7, part 2)

Paul was not a volunteer for the gospel; he was set apart for the gospel. In other words, to announce the good news became a purpose in his life. As Peter said:

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.

1 Peter 2:9 ESV

Paul’s gospel was not a different one than the one the other apostles preached. His gospel was about Jesus, in whom we have found, perfectly expressed, the excellencies of God. This gospel was not a new recipe or invention, but “just” a restatement of the promises found in the Old Testament through the prophets, the good news about the Son of God, the Messiah.

This Jesus, Son of David and Son of God, human and divine, who was crucified in weakness, died as a man, and resurrected in the power of God, is Paul’s Lord. He is the one who did not commit sin, but yet died for our sins.

This is the Gospel. The Lord is inviting the rebels (the sinners, you and me) to receive His grace and forgiveness, to submit to His kingdom, to live in obedience to the faith in Him because we love Him. It is a calling to belong to Him. This is not about feeling religious, but about stating allegiance.

Jew or non-Jew, man or woman, rich or poor, no matter who you are, you are invited to hear God’s good news about His Son. The most important thing in your life, in order to know who you are, is to know to whom you belong.

Comparison of methods

Meet our Devotional Blog Contributor: Josué Pineda

My Credentials in One Word (Romans 1:1-7)

What are your credentials? What qualifies you for the position you hold, the rank you have achieved, or the work you do?

The introductory paragraphs of the book of Romans, as is typical for Paul’s writings, are full of content. He writes about his identity in Christ, about the recipients and about God, and he writes about these things even more than he does in the introductions to his other letters. In this particular case, he also includes detailed information about the gospel.

What are your credentials?

Paul introduces himself as a slave belonging to the Messiah. If we were to focus on just this portion we would already have much to say, but for now let me simply point to the fact that introducing himself in this way automatically introduces Jesus as his Lord. Paul also presents himself as one who was called to be an apostle. He did not decide to be an apostle, nor a part of the delegation that Jesus chose, nor to volunteer to be sent on behalf of the Messiah. He was rescued, while being a rebel against the kingdom. He was set apart. He was taken from the inner side of the gates of Hades and brought to the kingdom of Jesus’ marvelous light, to officially announce the praises of Him who rescued him.

So what are Paul’s credentials? As he introduces himself to the Romans, we see that all of his credentials are connected to Jesus; His identity and His work. Paul’s credentials can be summed up in one word: Jesus.

What about you? Who are you in Christ? What are your credentials?

Comparison of methods

Meet our Devotional Blog Contributor: Josué Pineda

Fall Courses 2015

Open for Enrollment

Announcing the three 2015 Fall II courses on Biblearc. As always, our courses are online and interactive. May they help you dig deeper into the inexhaustible riches of God’s Word.

Fall II courses (Nov/Dec)

Introduction to Bracketing

From Wikimedia Commons, by Roymail

Introduction to Bracketing
Determining Main Point and Structure
Nov 3rd – Dec 22nd

This online, interactive course lays out the foundational concepts and structures necessary to begin using the Bracketing Bible study method. It features personal and extensive feedback on seven different assignments. We will take a hands-on approach to learning as we work through the first chapter of the Letter to the Philippians together.

Course details | Enrollment page

Didactics course

Learn to prepare a teaching from your study

Didactics
Preparing a Teaching from an Arc, Bracket or Phrase
Nov 4th – Dec 9th

This course will focus on insights that go into taking your study of the text via Arcing, Bracketing or Phrasing and turning it into a teaching. We will wrestle through how to be faithful to the Bible and relevant to the culture, and weigh the interplay between declaring truths and proving that those truths indeed come from the text of scripture. This will be both a practical course with attention to process as well as a discussion of big picture principles.

Course details | Enrollment page

The Island of Crete

Introduction to Phrasing
Tracing the Arguments of Scripture
Nov 3rd – Dec 22nd

Students will learn all of the facets of phrasing and draw theological insights from Titus. Phrasing is an excellent tool for determining a biblical author’s main point and how he supports it. The course is designed for everyone from pastors to interested lay-people.

Course details | Enrollment page

Eternal Salvation For Those Who Obey Him. (Heb 4:13-5:10, Part 2)

In Hebrews 5:9, the writer says that Jesus, having suffered and been made perfect, became the source of eternal salvation to all who obey him. What does it mean to ‘obey him’? What can we learn from the context?
 
We are told in the preceeding verse that Jesus himself learned obedience – I think this means he gained a full appreciation of human obedience – through what he suffered. And in the verse preceeding that we see that Jesus’ response to suffering was not to have a stiff upper lip and soldier on, but to reverently, earnestly, desperately, cry out to God for help. Jesus lived in close dependence on His Father.

Jesus’ response to suffering was not to have a stiff upper lip and soldier on, but to reverently, earnestly, desperately, cry out to God for help.

We see a similar theme in Heb 4:16, where the readers are exhorted to draw near to the throne of grace for help in their time of need. God has provided them with His Son as a sympathetic yet perfect representative, now enthroned in heaven. Our weakness is well known: we are to draw near, depending on his grace, for help.

So what does it mean to obey him? It includes, at least, a life of urgent yet reverent fellowship with God, expresssed through earnest prayer. In our day to day lives, we are the needy – we are completely exposed before God (Heb 4:13) – and we obey him by drawing near to His throne, through His Son our great high priest, for help.

Heb 5

Meet our Devotional Blog Contributor: Robert Elphick

Online Course: Bracketing—Determining Main Point and Structure

Nov 3rd – Dec 22nd

This online, interactive course lays out the foundational concepts and structures necessary to begin using the Bracketing Bible study method. It features personal and extensive feedback on seven different assignments. We will take a hands-on approach to learning as we work through the first chapter of the Letter to the Philippians together.

Note: This course features the new discourse module, redesigned to make learning easier by leaps and bounds.

Tuition

Basic enrollment  $59 ($49 with early enrollment)
Discussion enrollment  $99 ($89 with early enrollment)  recommended
One-on-one enrollment  $149 ($139 with early enrollment)

Enrollees to this course will receive 2 free months of The Biblearc Subscription.

Interactive lectures This course includes seven interactive, 1-hour lectures, in addition to an introductory lecture the first week. You may watch these lectures live, or at your convenience. One-on-one and Discussion enrollment students will be invited to participate in the lectures via online video chat. Live lecture recording times will be scheduled in coordination with these students the first week of the course and then announced to all students.

Length  This is a 8-week course.

Prerequisites  None

Discussion enrollment  In addition to lectures and feedback, discussion enrollment gives you a one-hour group discussion time each week with the instructor of the course. Groups are made up of 5-9 students. Rated 4.5 / 5 stars in significance by former discussion enrollees.

Group time options Sun @ 6pm | Wed @ 7pm
(All times in CDT. Click to view them in your local time.)

One-on-one enrollment  One-on-one enrollment allows you to enjoy a half hour of one-on-one time with the instructor each week, in addition to the standard provisions of the course. Rated 5 / 5 stars in significance by former one-on-one enrollees.

Assignments This course includes seven extensive, biblically-rooted assignments which will be promptly corrected by the instructor and returned each week.

PinedaAndy HubertInstructors  Andy Hubert is the creator of Biblearc and lecturer of Greek at Israel College of the Bible. Andy holds a Masters of Pastoral and Biblical Studies from Bethlehem College and Seminary. Josué Pineda (who will be correcting assignments and leading discussion groups and one-on-one times) has worked as a pastor and church planter in Honduras, was the Director for Honduras of Precept International Ministries, and has spearheaded Biblearc’s Arcing courses in Spanish.

Work load  Between the lectures (1 hr/wk) and assignments (~3 hrs/wk), participants should expect to spend approximately 4 hours per week on this course.

Grading This course uses a 100 point grading system for all assignments. Students who complete this course with a display of proficiency in Bracketing will receive an indication of this on their Biblearc account. This will allow people searching shared work the ability to find the arcs and brackets of those users who have had training in these methods. (still in development)

Google Hangouts This course uses Google’s “Hangouts on Air” to facilitate the live lectures, and ordinary Google Hangouts to facilitate discussion groups. All Discussion group and One-on-one enrollees will be required to register for a free Google+ account if they do not already have one. (We will provide you information on how to do so.)

From former students

“No Bible study method has helped me see and enjoy more in God’s Word than arcing and bracketing. The bracketing class covered the basics of the method while also encouraging the student to excel still more. I’m grateful to God for Biblearc.com.”

“This class was terrific! I often think I see the connections among verses of scripture, but sometimes have a hard time drawing out the actual relationship. This class really helped me “connect the dots.” Arcing and bracketing have quickly become one of the most used arrows in my quiver of bible study tools.”

“This course is, in my opinion, a necessary investment for any serious preacher and Bible study leader who does not have prior experience in bracketing. Bracketing offers so much to the process of exegesis and sermon preparation – and for the price of this course and what you get in return, it will be one of the most worthwhile uses of your money.”

“Learning the bracketing method has not only helped me to dig deeper for more insight into God’s word, but it has really helped to ground both my mind and heart in it!”

100% of former students surveyed recommend this course to others!

Additional information: What is Bracketing | Request a Scholarship | Give a Scholarship | Refund Policy